Flower garden and landscape

8 best plants for landscape hedges

Pin
Send
Share
Send


Landscape or natural hedges are the most massive and voluminous, requiring a considerable area, but incomparable in their picturesque views of green fences. Free-growing hedges are single-row, double-row and even more complex, mono-species or combined, compares favorably with regular simplicity of care and the ability to enjoy luxurious flowering. They create a colorful lush background, not only reliably protecting from prying eyes, but also turning the garden landscape into a fairytale kingdom. Hardy, persistent, not requiring constant haircuts and gratefully responding to the care of the hedge, you can create gardens that are full of colors and aromas, easy to care for, in which you can escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

A hedge of blossoming lilacs.

Let's take a closer look at the 8 best cultures for luxurious flowering hedges of landscape type:

1. Lilac

Long become a garden classic, lilacs are rightly called one of the most fragrant shrubs. Unpretentious and universal, it flaunts a dense, always looking bright and fresh large enough foliage and forms a dense, powerful, dense hedge that allows you to reliably protect from prying eyes. In spite of the fact that lilac drops off foliage early enough in the fall, it completely compensates for this drawback with the attractiveness of late spring flowering, bright summer foliage and the size of the created screen. Huge inflorescences-brushes of lilac with a bewitching aroma and soft colors of a white-pink-purple palette bloom even on wild species of lilac. In addition, this shrub provides numerous shoots that can be used as seedlings. Lilac looks good in multirow and mixed hedges.

This is one of the most hardy and easy-care beautiful flowering garden shrubs. Lilac is hardy, does not require additional watering, adapts well to different soils and climates, is not afraid of formation, is resistant to diseases and pests and grows rapidly. Lilac hedges can be planted in sunny areas, on high-quality, loose, neutral or slightly alkaline soil.

A hedge of blossoming lilacs.

The advantages of lilac hedges:

  • large sizes (from 1.5-2 meters in compact species to 3-4 m in ordinary ones);
  • the density, splendor and massiveness of the fence with amazing softness of lines and picturesqueness;
  • very strong aroma;
  • ease of cultivation and care.

Best hedge views

The most spectacular hedges can be obtained from the Amur lilac, which tolerates drought and excess moisture, retains a round and lush crown shape from below even without a special formation. Also look very good:

  • in low fences up to one and a half meters high, Meyer’s lilacs,
  • in high hedges, varieties of Chinese and Persian lilacs;
  • all varieties of ordinary, Hungarian and shaggy lilacs.

When choosing plants, bet on proven and classic plants in your area. The most modest representatives of common lilac and other species, accessible, familiar both in growing technology and in flowering characteristics, are more preferable than varietal and rare forms, which are better left for solitaire parties and decorative groups. It is advisable to initially select varieties that are characterized by a rounded rather than elongated shape of the bush.

Planting a hedge

Lilac hedges can be laid both in late autumn and at the very beginning of the season (even before buds appear on the shoots). It can be created both from ordinary young delenki with an open root system, and from container seedlings. The best option is two to three year old seedlings with a powerful root system. Before planting, all shoots must be cut to the level of 2-3 buds, leaving short branches up to 15 cm high and shorten too long roots.

All hedges standard in height (from 2 to 3 m) assume planting at a distance of 1.5 m between the bushes. Lower types of lilacs are placed at a distance of 30-60 cm to 1 m, the highest - after 2 m. Landing is best done in individual landing pits about half a meter deep and the same width, at least a thin layer of drainage is necessarily formed at the bottom of the pit, and compost or other organic matter, full mineral fertilizer and wood ash are mixed into the soil.

A hedge of blossoming lilacs.

After planting, each bush must be watered abundantly, and the soil should be mulched with humus or peat. Before the growth of greenery begins, lilacs are watered weekly, if possible to accelerate the development of the hedge, such a frequency of irrigation is maintained until the optimum height of the hedge is reached.

Features of caring for the lilac hedge

The first 2-3 years, the living screen is not cut and not fed. Top dressing begins in the fourth year of cultivation, they are introduced in early spring, alternating organic and full mineral fertilizers. Watering such a hedge is not needed. As for cropping, then it is practically not carried out. To thicken the hedge on the grown bushes, leave up to ten of the strongest shoots and from 4 years conduct annual thinning to improve flowering. The rest of the pruning is carried out only at the ends of the branches and is reduced to removing peduncles after flowering and stimulating thickening of the lower part of the bushes due to pruning of lateral shoots. If necessary, lilacs will also tolerate strong pruning, when exposing the lower part of the bushes and neglect, you can also resort to the method of cardinal rejuvenation, cutting off all the bushes at the level of 10-15 cm from the soil.

Continuation of the list of the best plants for landscape hedges, see the next page.

Pin
Send
Share
Send