Garden

5 exotic vegetables that I advise everyone to grow

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Potatoes, cucumbers, tomatoes, beets, dill - these vegetables have long been universally recognized, and their high taste and nutritional value do not require proof. Many gardeners from year to year grow the usual standard set in their beds. But, as the English say, "everything new is the best." Those who like to tinker with in the garden will be happy to learn that very familiar "relatives" exist among friends of vegetables. With their help, you can diversify the menu and make the set of garden crops not so banal.

Exotic Pepino Vegetable

For our family, this task turned out to be especially urgent, since we prefer to adhere to a vegetarian diet and are always interested in expanding the list of tasty and healthy products grown by our own hands. All the vegetables that I will discuss in this publication do not seem to us to be fanciful excesses, they are firmly settled on our beds and the dining table.

1. Pepino

Pepino, "melon pear", or "sweet cucumber" is a close relative of tomato and potato. The original culture has many names and even more descriptions of the characteristics of taste, appearance and cultivation methods, so I consider it appropriate to talk about how this plant personally made an impression on me.

My first acquaintance with pepino happened spontaneously and the "exotic tomato" was far from immediately among my favorite cultures. It all started with the fact that one day I liked a bag of seeds with the image of an outlandish roundish "either a vegetable, or a fruit" resembling an unusual striped tomato.

Volumetric conflicting instructions were attached to the seeds, from which I learned that the strange "tomato" is more suitable for the greenhouse, and in order to get the crop, sowing pepino had to be carried out at the beginning of last fall.

However, the seeds were sown in February. Pepino flowers and leaves are very similar to potato and tomato, and the first ovaries on the bushes also tied at the same time as the tomatoes. But no matter how much I tried to wait for the full ripening of the exot, the fruits remained solid and sour in taste.

In September, I collected all the available crops and placed them for ripening in the room. Numerous articles on the network promised that in the room the pepino will certainly ripen by the New Year, filling the house with the scent of melon. However, I did not wait for anything like this. Toward spring, the striped “tomatoes” finally softened, and the peel became wrinkled. It was then that we finally found out the pleasant sweet and sour taste of the mysterious pepino.

Despite all the vicissitudes, I still want to recommend gardeners to grow pepino on their own. At least, due to the fact that at the end of winter, sweet fruits will be an excellent substitute for dubious fruits from the store and diversify the menu.

Pepino fruits.

Features of growing pepino

Sow pepino seedlings for seedlings as early as possible, but it is not necessary to sow in the fall, as the fruits have time to set, even if you prepare seedlings from mid-winter. Both in seedlings and after planting in the soil, pepino needs a large amount of potassium, and in the absence of fertilizing with potash fertilizer, the leaves turn yellow.

Pepino will develop best in the greenhouse, but in the open field you can also expect a crop in a well-lit place. Powerful plants are best tied to a support.

Continuing the list of exotic vegetables that I grow myself and recommend to others, read on the next page.

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