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Valerian. Historical facts

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The healing qualities of feline maun in Russia have long been valued. Traditional medicine used it in cases of shake - malaria. Therefore, the plant was called shaking grass. There were other names - forty-stitched grass, bloody rib, averyan, Adam's rib, aromatic, earthenware incense, febrile root, overpowered, standing, bloody potion. Broths valerian drank with toad disease (angina pectoris), insomnia, headaches, diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

Treated with shaking grass and epilepsy - epilepsy was called in ancient times. In domestic official medicine, this drug was introduced by foreign doctors. In the Russian translated herbalist of 1614 there is a chapter devoted to Valerian.

Valeriana

The beginning of industrial procurement of Valerian officinalis dates back to the 17th century in our country. According to royal decrees, it was necessary "to collect herbs, flowers and roots that are suitable for medicinal work," as well as "ask all kinds of people who know medicinal herbs that would be useful for diseases in medicine by a person." Knowledgeable people informed the Pharmaceutical Order that, they say, grass fu in Greek, lychinis in Latin, and in Russian shaking rooting, cat mown, a potion damn found in the forests near Moscow. Parties of herbalists gathered it and sent it to the capital. Valerian industrial preparations were carried out under Peter I to provide medicine for the regular Russian army. At the same time, they used the instructions of old manuals: "The grass itself and the root have a heavy spirit; cats rub against this grass, for this we preserve the grass that we want to put in greenery. We collect that root in the month of August."

The Italians believed that the herbs collected on the night before San Giovanni (it was dedicated to the summer solstice) have special healing and love properties. One of the most valuable plants is valerian. It turns out that she expelled the diseases of the “body and soul”, scared ghosts, and served as a love potion.

In the monument of Indo-Tibetan medicine "Zeyzhar migzhzhan", which describes the properties of 323 medicinal plants, the herb spang-spos (valerian) says that it "suppresses the chronic fever of poison, and is also used for the disease caused by the evil spirit" gdon " Tibetan medicine, as you know, was closely associated with Buddhism, hence the religious, mystical stratification of many of its provisions, for example, severe, untreatable diseases (these primarily included cerebral hemorrhages with paralysis, acute cardiovascular and mental sneak Bani) with unclear at the time reasons explained influence supernatural -. evil spirits By "heat poison" implied intoxication at elevated temperature, inflammatory and infectious diseases.

Valeriana

In 1665, a certain doctor Samuel Collins presented a whole treatise on Valerian, in which he wrote, in particular: “Valerian grass, and in Greek fu, is decent: make vodka from that herb, and that vodka is good for full-time illness; yes the same grass overseas is put in the abalone (soup, ear and brew altogether) for all health and eat from the wind, and in which people’s liver will deteriorate and from any constipation and female sex from monthly constipation, take from water constipation. cut the herbs finely, cook in Rennes or with birch sap, or in church wine, and to rinse the mouth in which people in the company showered or some other disease or in the gums of scurvy. Yes, take the same root from the fire and from pestilence, and wounded people heal wounds; and those who have bile on their face. "

It is interesting to know that the Italian doctor Phoebe Columella, who lived at the beginning of the 17th century, experienced the effects of Valerian infusion on himself and recommended that his colleagues widely use this sedative. Apparently, then the modern name of the plant appeared.

It comes from the Latin word valere, which means to be healthy. A very apt name for medicinal herbs. It came to us from the west, with official medicine.

From the medical vocabulary, the name turned into colloquial speech and strengthened in scientific usage. Apparently, in the 17th century it only came into use, therefore, in herbalists and manuals on medicine, in order to avoid confusion, Greek, Latin, German and other names of valerian were indicated.

Already in the 18th century, valerian was included in the state pharmacopeias of many European countries as a sedative, antispasmodic. So they know him to this day.

Valeriana

It is quite possible that the Egyptians used Valerian root not only for religious and magic purposes, but also found a completely earthly purpose for it - they used it as a sedative. The aesculapius of Hellas and Rome knew about the influence of this plant on the central nervous system. Hippocrates mentions this plant. Dioscorides believed that valerian is able to "control" thoughts. Pliny attributed grass to means that stimulate thought. Ancient authors called Valerian the word "fu". Under this name, she appears in the "Canon of Medicine" Avicenna.

The Greek name "fu" valerian was included in most medieval herbalists, medical supplies, medical treatises. In those days, it was known not only as a drug for nervous diseases, disorders of the digestive tract, but also as a magical tool against evil spirits. According to legend, on the day of the Assumption (August 15), it was necessary to collect elecampane, window sill, valerian, God's tree (a type of wormwood), bitter wormwood, tansy, tie them in a bundle and consecrate in the church. Then the plants had to be dried and on certain nights (Christmas, New Year and baptism) to fumigate with them bedrooms and stables.
Superstitious people believed that witches and brownies would not do any harm in the rooms so smoked.

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